Market’s Long Overdue Correction Seems to Be Starting

8 04 2013

Jonathan N. Castle, CFP®, ChFC®

Jonathan N. Castle, CFP®, ChFC®

I thought I would take just a moment to let everyone know that we have been watching the market closely. It looks like the long upward sprint the market has taken over the last 4 months might be coming to a pause.

This is not unusual at all; billions of dollars have been fed into the capital markets over the last 4 months as the veil of uncertainly about taxes and fiscal policy has been lifted. Pension funds and individual investors have flooded the stock markets and stock mutual funds with more dollars this past quarter than we’ve seen in a long, long time. Wall Street’s traders have seen their target prices for stocks met, exceeded, and exceeded again. In general, the economic data we’ve see reported has been mostly positive, with just enough bad news to remind us that the stock market still has its dangers, but not enough to get investors worried that another recession is around the corner.

So, with the information we have at present, it looks like we are in for a regular, run-of-the-mill correction of about 3 to 7%. This happens, on average, 3 times per year, and is the normal breathing of a healthy and functioning market.

It is important to keep in mind that large, painful, and excessively long bear markets typically occur only during times of great economic upset (Great Depression, Great Recession, Tech Bubble Burst, Oil Embargo). We are monitoring all of our indicators and have far better warning systems in place than existed in 2007 and 2008, and expect to be able to sidestep a great deal of the damage that those “Perfect Storms” tend to dish out. At this time, Recession Alert(TM) places the odds of the United States economy entering a recession within the next 6 months at only 6.4% – indicating that the stock market remains the best place to be for investors trying to stay ahead of taxes and beat inflation.

However, unexpected or “surprise” events can turn a normal 5% correction into an abrupt harsh 20% correction. This occurs every 3-4 years, on average. Good examples are the stock market “crash” of 1987, the breakout of Desert Storm, minor recessions, the downgrading of the US debt in 2011, and other geopolitical occurrences. Currently, we have two primary concerns that would fall into this category – the prospective bailout of Cyprus (and the EU issues that seem to never end), and the possibility of Kim Jong-Un actually engaging in real military conflict for no apparent reason other than to appear as a strong leader to his people.

The risk of military conflict does not lie in Korea’s ability to hurt the US; that risk is minimal from a military confrontation perspective. While the North enjoys a huge advantage over the South in artillery abilities, those abilities would likely be quickly eradicated by the overwhelming air superiority the US and the South enjoys. The real risk lies in the possibility of China, South Korea, or Japan entering any such the conflict and creating massive instability in the Far East. I believe that China would likely rather see peace in the region, but so far, they have taken a wait-and-see approach.

Whatever happens, we will remain vigilant and observe events as they develop. Ultimately, I believe that normal market functions will continue and am very optimistic about some of the developments we see occurring within our economy – especially in the areas of energy production, rail, manufacturing, home-building, and electronic medical records. I feel it is likely that the decade-long “Secular Bear Market” we have been mired in for the last several years is approaching an end, and that now is a great time to be a long-term investor! However, it remains important to make sure that investors are aware of their risk tolerances – and that portfolios are constructed properly in order to weather those occasional unexpected thunderstorm that can blow in rapidly and give us an uncomfortable bump now and then.

S&P500 1 Year Chart

S&P500 1 Year Chart

Jon Castle

http://www.WealthGuards.com

This blog is for informational purposes only. This is neither an offer to purchase nor sell any securities. All investing involves the potential of loss – including invested principal. Indices quoted are general barometers of security price movement. You cannot invest directly in an index. All information is obtained from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance. No tax or legal advice is given nor intended.

Investment advisory services provided by Paragon Wealth Strategies, LLC, a registered investment advisor.

10245 Centurion Pkwy. N. Ste 105, Jacksonville FL 32256 (904) 861-0093 www.WealthGuards.com

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP(R), CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER(tm) and federally registered CFP (with flame logo) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements

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Stock Market at a 4-year High… Again…

23 08 2012

While it has been an unusually long pause between market updates this time, I can assure you that we were not asleep at the wheel. In this instance, no news was good news, as the stock market has maintained its generally upward trend for the past several months with only moderate volatility for us to endure.

As of this writing, the United States stock market is approaching the high of 13279 on the DOW and 1419 on the S&P500 that it had previously reached on May 1st of this year, before the 10% correction that we went through during June and July. Since then, we have had generally uninteresting economic news on the domestic front, no real political unrest that has given us pause, and the Europeans continue to struggle through massive debt issues and one of the worst recessions that region of the world has had to face in several decades.

It can be easy to fall into the trap of thinking that “something good” must actually happen for the stock markets to go up. This is actually not the case. Given the fact that bond markets have gone up continually over the last several years, the current prices of bonds are so high, that most investors have begun to realize that future returns of the bond market are likely to be disappointing. We are beginning to see a shift of capital from what is historically an asset of moderate risk and return (bonds) to an asset class that historically has been riskier – but is currently acknowledged to be undervalued (stocks – especially blue chips).

As a result – nothing spectacular is happening in the economy to move us measurably forward, but as money shifts from bonds to stocks (or from sideline cash to stocks) – the price of stocks will tend to move up simply as a result of supply and demand. In other words – beause more and more investors are dissatisfied with the expected returns from bonds in the forseeable future – stocks seem like a more attractive alternative, especially for long-term investors. The current owners of the stocks must be convinced to sell them – and this “convincing” is done by investors paying higher and higher prices for the stocks over time.

Approaching a new or previous high is not without danger, however. Those who have invested for a while also understand that when the market approaches a previous high mark, it may fail to break through – almost as if an invisible lid has been placed upon the market itself. Sometimes, even in bull markets, the market must pull back and “take a new run” at the “lid” to break through. Currently the market does not have a great deal of momentum; while investors are buying stocks, they are not doing so with enough gusto or wild abandon for us to be convinced that a breakthrough will occur. So… a potential correction may be in store for us.

As we have mentioned before, we are of the belief that the stock market will likely remain in a “trading range” for several years – with a slight slant to the upside (just enough to make investing worthwhile, I suspect) but not a roaring bull market that we enjoyed after the last recession. Instead, we are likely to enjoy several months of upmarkets, followed by several months of downmarkets… squeaking out 7 to 8% returns on an annualized basis, and paying for it with a good bit of volatility and lack of market direction. Dividends will likely play a significant role in creating portfolio growth. We have adjusted portfolios to try to maximize investor returns (within risk tolerance) for this scenario, and continue to admonish patience.

Most experts believe that we are unlikely to see any real economic or fiscal news between now and the election. While it is possible that world events may cause unrest, or that some good news may come out of Europe that bolsters markets for a while, in general it seems that most institutional investors are in a “wait and see” mood. Market movements, however, can give some insight into likely election results. A strong stock market during an election year has historically increased Presidential approval ratings and would likely increase the chance of the current President being reelected. If, on the other hand, the market should falter between now and November, incumbent approval ratings are likely to decline, thus increasing the odds of the Romney/Ryan ticket being successful on election day.

Jon Castle

http://www.WealthGuards.com

This blog is for informational purposes only.  This is neither an offer to purchase nor sell any securities.  All investing involves the potential of loss – including invested principal.  Indices quoted are general barometers of security price movement.  You cannot invest directly in an index.  All information is obtained from sources deemed reliable but not guaranteed.  Past performance is not a guarantee of future performance.  No tax or legal advice is given nor intended.

Investment advisory services provided by Paragon Wealth Strategies, LLC, a registered investment advisor.

10245 Centurion Pkwy. N. Ste 105, Jacksonville FL 32256   (904) 861-0093  www.WealthGuards.com  Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP(R), CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER(tm) and federally registered CFP (with flame logo) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements





Tax Breaks for IRA Distributions When Donating to Charity

21 04 2011

by Michelle Ash,

We’re all looking for legitimate ways we can save money on taxes, right?  Well, if you’re looking to have an extra bang-for-your-buck with a charitable donation, read on.

In a moment, I’ll talk about the specifics of a nice tax break that those over the age of 70.5 (who take Required Minimum Distributions from IRA’s) can use for making charitable donations.  But even if you’re  a) under the age of 70.5, or b) not looking to make a charitable contribution from your IRA, there might still be some helpful information in this article for you.

Charitable Donation Basics:

Anyone can give a charitable donation.  Without citing any particular statistic, I’ll just say that in these difficult economic times, I believe any charity would welcome a donation of any size.

For many Americans, though, a charitable donation can also mean a nice tax break.  Who gets the tax breaks?  The short answer is anyone who itemizes their deductions on Schedule A has the opportunity to take a charitable deduction.  Without getting too detailed, though, it’s important to know that deduction of charitable donations is limited to a maximum of 50% of your adjusted gross income (AGI).  That doesn’t mean you can’t give more away – it just means you don’t get a tax break for it.  Most Americans who give charitable donations don’t make them from their Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRA’s) – after all, those are for use in retirement, right?  Instead, most Americans just make a donation from cash flow, or maybe from an asset they want to give away, like an old car.  Age doesn’t matter with regards to making these types of donations.  The IRS will give you tax deductions for charitable contributions of this sort, regardless of your age.

The Qualified Charitable Distribution (QCD)

But for those who are age 70.5 and above, and who want to use those required IRA distributions for a charitable donation, there’s an extra tax break.  If the RMD is pulled out and sent directly to the charitable institution, amounts up to $100,000 may be excluded from the taxpayer’s gross income.  These distributions are  not subject to the normal 50% of gross income limitation, so potentially they could give higher than 50% of AGI in total and  still receive a tax break.  This provision exists for each taxpayer, so if a husband and wife each want to contribute, they can each do so up to $100,000 each from their own IRA’s – for a total of $200,000 combined.

Important details to follow to make sure the transaction is qualified:

  • Contributions must be from traditional or Roth IRAs.  QCDs cannot be made from employer-sponsored IRAs (Simplified Employee Pensions (SEP-IRAs) and Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE-IRAs), or from defined contribution retirement plans (for example, 401(k) plans or 403(b) plans).
  • Individuals must be older than 70.5 when the QCD is made.
  • Charities must be eligible to receive tax-deductible charitable contributions.
  • The distribution must be a trustee-to-trustee transfer; that is, a direct transfer from the IRA to the charity.
  • The distribution first comes from taxable funds, then from any nondeductible IRA contributions. Previously, distributions would have been allocated proportionately between deductible and nondeductible contributions.

How long are the QCD tax breaks available for?

Under current law, the deadline for using the Qualified Charitable Deduction rules for an IRA RMD  are until December 31, 2011.  Note, too, in the rules above that the RMD money must go directly to the charitable institution.  If you’ve already taken your RMD out of your IRA for the year, and wish you had done it this way,  it’s unfortunately too late, at least according to the current tax laws.  You cannot put the money back in your IRA and remove it again – such an attempt just won’t work.   You can still give that money away to charity, but it won’t be excluded from your gross income and it will be subject to maximum charitable gift deduction limitations.

Will this provision be extended into future years? 

At present I haven’t seen any information on that subject.  The current rules have been extended from previous years of law in 2007 and then 2009, so it seems likely that an extension might be under future consideration.  I would bet if the charities had things their way, they’d probably advocate for an extension, as it’s likely that only Americans who are required to make IRA withdrawals but don’t need the money are the ones using this rule.  Do charities have lobbyists who advocate for this kind of stuff?  I don’t know, but it sure would make sense to me!

Disclaimer:  This blog article is not personal tax advice.  Please consult your tax professional for personal, specific tax information.

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP(R), CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER(tm) and federally registered CFP (with flame logo) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements.

Investment advisory services provided by Paragon Wealth Strategies, LLC., a registered investment advisor.





So I’ve Been Saving…Now What?

4 04 2011

 Michael Carignan, CFP®, CRPC®

Have you ever wondered how to get a clear picture of all of your current financial resources and how much retirement savings you need to provide your vision of retirement, taking into account your potential health or market risks?  This is just one of many questions people ask when thinking about personal retirement planning.  If you find your self in this boat, there are a number of solutions for you.  First, with some time, research and diligence, spreadsheets and of-the-shelf software, you can creat your own retirement plan.  However, it is likely that if you are asking these questions, you probably don’t have one of those key ingredients to success, or you would already know the answer.  A more comforting solution may be to get some professional help.  WebMD can help you diagnose some medical conditions, but most people feel better having a trained medical professional give them their expert opinion and recommend a treatment if warranted.  In a similar fashion, finding the right financial professional to help you can be a key step in the right direction on your path to financial success.

Just like finding the right doctor is important, (you don’t want to go see your dermatologist if you have a cough) finding the right kind of financial professional can be equally important.  There are many financial professionals out there; selecting the right one may be the most important factor in ensuring you have a favorable planning experience.  There are some questions you need to ask when looking for a professional to help you construct a retirement plan.  The first question should be, “are they qualified to provide the answers I’m looking for?”  One good resource in this search is www.letsmakeaplan.org where you can search for a local Certified Financial Planner™.

Most people are more comfortable dealing with a doctor that has the same philosophy on treatment and they personally like.  By “same philosophy on treatment,” I mean do they recommend a diet and exercise regimen or a or do they push a diet pill to help lose weight?  If you and your doctor disagree on the basic philosophy of medical treatment, you probably will have disappointing results, since you won’t follow his or her advice.  In the same way, it is very important to look for a financial professional that has the same general philosophy that you do when it comes to investing and money management.  If you believe that it’s possible to outsmart the financial markets and pick the best performing mutual fund or stock next year, then you need to find a broker who believes that as well.  If you believe that investing involves taking some prudent risks and adhering to a long term plan with a scientifically designed portfolio, you likely should  find a different advisor.  Neither philosophy is necessarily wrong, but making sure you select a financial professional that has the same philosophy as you have is of paramount importance to a successful planning relationship.

Some additional specific questions you should ask are:

    • Do you prefer fee based or commission based compensation for your advisor?
    • Do they have experience with other clients like you?
    • Can they advise you on all aspects of your financial life or will you need several advisors to get the answers you need?
    • What is the charge for the plan?  In most cases, you get what you pay for; if it’s free there is going to be a sales agenda you might not know about right away.
    • What is included in the service they provide?
    • Will they be able to help you implement planning suggestions?  If so, is it a requirement of the planning process?  Be careful of the solutions that can only be done through them.
    • Do they make “suitable” recommendations or are they a “fiduciary”?  (For more information on the difference click here)

Finding a professional that you can understand and trust is critical when choosing to have a retirement plan constructed for you and your family.  You are unlikely to follow the advice, good or bad, if you do not trust the person providing the advice.  Once you find your ideal fit of personality and capabilities, be ready and willing to provide answers to all of their questions, since a retirement plan is only as good as the information you provide.  Don’t hesitate to ask them probing questions and provide honest answers if they ask you some difficult questions.  When dealing with the money you have worked so hard to accumulate, stumbling into retirement without a carefully crafted plan can be a dangerous prospect at best. Once your retirement plan is complete, then it becomes time to “work your plan” if you have a few more years, or “live your plan” if you are already retired.

The earlier you start planning for retirement the better, becasue finding yourself in retirement and unsure if you’ll be able to live it how you’d like is a scary proposition.  It has been my experience that those who are most successful in retirement have taken the time to get the advice that helps them sleep well at night and knowing they have done everything they could to create the retirement they wanted for them and their family.

Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP(R), CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER(tm) and federally registered CFP (with flame logo) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements.

Investment advisory services offered by Paragon Wealth Strategies LLC, a registered investment advisor.